Routes of Administration

 

Today, I ran into an issue that should be shared with all patients. I saw one of my favorite wife/husband patient combinations during my shift. I met them not long after starting at my current pharmacy, and I was able to help them save some money on prescriptions. They have sought me out for advice ever since.

Today, they came into the pharmacy to return a steroid cream. I asked them why, and the wife responded that the list of side effects on the medication guide scared her. She said she had decided not to use it. I asked her if she has discussed not using it with her physician, and she told me she had not. So, I started to go through the medication guide with her sentence by sentence to see what was the most troubling for her.

After some explanation, I realized the side effect she was most worried about was the immunosuppressant effect steroids can have. I explained to her that this adverse reaction was not one that should concern her too much. I told her that this effect happens after months of therapy and is more likely to occur with oral steroids. She calmed down immensely afterwards. She ended up taking the medication back home with her. I encouraged her to call or come back if she had more questions.

I have come across this situation a few times before. A patient has a non-oral therapy. They decide to read the warnings and other patient information, and they come across side effects that are mainly related to the oral form of the drug. It scares them, and they stop taking it. Once they realize there is no reason to worry about side effects A and B, though, they calm down and become more adherent.

One thing patients need to realize is that the medication guides that print out with the prescription labels at the pharmacy are required to include everything under the sun for that drug. It will include the side effects for the oral form, as well as other routes of administration (topical, rectal, vaginal, etc). So if you are picking up a prescription for a non-oral medication and are concerned or unsure, ask the pharmacist which side effects are the ones most likely to happen while you’re on it. Try not to scare yourself out of using the medication before you ever use it. As a general rule with many medications, you will probably never experience most of the side effects listed on the medication guide, especially if the prescription is for something non-oral. They are there to tell you all the possibilities for every person who might ever use the medication, not to forecast what will definitely happen when you use it.

 

Image courtesy of http://i1107.photobucket.com/albums/h393/Douglas_Ross/rxPills.png

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